"Yummy Homemade Candied Ginger" by Michelle - Musely
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"Yummy Homemade Candied Ginger"

posted in Food & Drink
03/01/2016
  • Homemade Candied Ginger
Makes 1 cup

1/2 pound fresh ginger 
1/2 cup sugar
    Homemade Candied Ginger
    Makes 1 cup

    1/2 pound fresh ginger
    1/2 cup sugar
  • Peel the ginger and cut it into the thinnest possible slices using a mandolin or chef’s knife. Place the slices in a medium saucepan and cover with enough water to submerge them. Bring to a boil, then turn the heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer until tender. The slices will be a deeper shade
    Peel the ginger and cut it into the thinnest possible slices using a mandolin or chef’s knife. Place the slices in a medium saucepan and cover with enough water to submerge them. Bring to a boil, then turn the heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer until tender. The slices will be a deeper shade
  • of yellow and have a more rubbery consistency. Reserve 1/4 cup cooking liquid and drain.
    of yellow and have a more rubbery consistency. Reserve 1/4 cup cooking liquid and drain.
  • Return the ginger to the pot along with the reserved cooking liquid and the sugar. Bring to a rapid simmer over a high flame. Turn the heat down to medium and continue to simmer the ginger, stirring frequently, until the liquid has evaporated and the sugar begins to crystallize, about 10 to 15
    Return the ginger to the pot along with the reserved cooking liquid and the sugar. Bring to a rapid simmer over a high flame. Turn the heat down to medium and continue to simmer the ginger, stirring frequently, until the liquid has evaporated and the sugar begins to crystallize, about 10 to 15
  • minutes. Transfer the ginger immediately to a cooling rack or parchment-lined sheet pan. Spread in an even layer until cool enough to touch. Discard the excess ginger sugar, or reserve for another use. Store the candied ginger in an airtight container for up to three weeks.
    minutes. Transfer the ginger immediately to a cooling rack or parchment-lined sheet pan. Spread in an even layer until cool enough to touch. Discard the excess ginger sugar, or reserve for another use. Store the candied ginger in an airtight container for up to three weeks.
  • Most recipes call for the ginger to be transferred to a cooling rack. I don’t own one of these either, but a parchment-lined baking sheet seemed to do a fine job. Best of all, the ginger cooled much more quickly than I imagined, which meant a speedy taste test and minimal tongue burns to show for it
    Most recipes call for the ginger to be transferred to a cooling rack. I don’t own one of these either, but a parchment-lined baking sheet seemed to do a fine job. Best of all, the ginger cooled much more quickly than I imagined, which meant a speedy taste test and minimal tongue burns to show for it
  • As I bopped around the internet, the method that seemed the easiest and most intuitive was Alton Brown’s. His technique was simple: simmer the ginger in water until tender, drain, then combine the ginger with an equal amount of sugar and some reserved cooking liquid. I thought that last element was
    As I bopped around the internet, the method that seemed the easiest and most intuitive was Alton Brown’s. His technique was simple: simmer the ginger in water until tender, drain, then combine the ginger with an equal amount of sugar and some reserved cooking liquid. I thought that last element was
  • rather clever, as the gingery cooking liquid adds even more flavor to the sugar crystals that eventually form as the water slowly evaporates. You know it’s done when there’s no liquid left in the pan, and the candied ginger looks just like what you’d buy at the store, only better.
    rather clever, as the gingery cooking liquid adds even more flavor to the sugar crystals that eventually form as the water slowly evaporates. You know it’s done when there’s no liquid left in the pan, and the candied ginger looks just like what you’d buy at the store, only better.
  • No candy thermometer necessary.
    No candy thermometer necessary.
  • Please like then share =)

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