Which Fat To Use And Why by Leila Stuke - Musely
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Which Fat To Use And Why

posted in Health & Fitness
04/12/2015
  • Hi there ;D
    lately I've been interested in the advantages and disadvantages of oil / fat in foods, since I saw some cool tips to this topic.
    I always heard poly- and mono-unsaturated fats were much better and healthier than saturated fats.

  • so basically saturated fats are easy for the body to use and unsaturated fats nead to be broken down
    so basically saturated fats are easy for the body to use and unsaturated fats nead to be broken down
  • This would mean, that Butter and coconutoil should be avoided and olive oil or sunflower oil used instead.
    Seems that this is not the final solution.
    Another trend is to favour Omega 3 or Omega 6 rich foods (=polyunsaturated fats), which doesnt seem to be the solution either.

  • Omega 6: Vegetable oils, margerine, nuts, seeds, grains, conventional meats
Omega 3: Fish, Flaxseed, chia seeds
    Omega 6: Vegetable oils, margerine, nuts, seeds, grains, conventional meats
    Omega 3: Fish, Flaxseed, chia seeds
  • Ideal for the body is a Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio of 3-5 to 1, in earlier time with native tribes it could even be 1-2 to 1.
    Nowadays in western society 20 to 1 is an average ratio. Too much Omega 6 with no compensatory Omega 3 leads to cronic inflammation.

  • In soybean oil, for which market share lies at around 90% in the US, Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio isn't that good, although I couldn't find exact numbers.
    sunflower oil and safflower oil or grape seed oil are all omega 6 rhich but do not have much omega 3, so they are to avoid...exept

  • exept if you choose to compensate for the Omega 3 fatty acids by using linseed oil, hempseed oil or walnut oil.
    Other options are Krill oil or fish oil

    The Omega 3 rhich oils need to be stored cool, in the dark and they should be used up quickly.

  • Less is more: If you try to get the perfect Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio (or n 6 n 3, as it's called), you will become desperate.

  • Just stick to these rules:

    high temperature> coconut oil or ghee

    on your bread or for baking: Butter is fine, you can opt for Bio - butter or raw milk butter

    for cooking and salads: extra native olive oil

  • Other oils, e. g. canola, appear to have a good n 6 n3 ratio. In the processing procedure however they get heated and hardened. So called "trans fatty acids" develop which are even worse than having too much Omega 6.

  • Thank you for reading up to here! If you want, you can like, follow, friend, ...If you find any mistakes or have questions I'll gladly react :D

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