WHAT THE PILL REALLY DOES TO YOUR BODY by Meth Lelis - Musely
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WHAT THE PILL REALLY DOES TO YOUR BODY

posted in Health & Fitness
11/13/2013
  • The birth control pill is one of the most groundbreaking drugs to be introduced in the past 50 years. It served as a player in the sexual revolution — giving women sexual freedom and allowing us to pull in the reins on family planning.
    The birth control pill is one of the most groundbreaking drugs to be introduced in the past 50 years. It served as a player in the sexual revolution — giving women sexual freedom and allowing us to pull in the reins on family planning.
  • -IT WEAKENS OUR SENSE OF SMELL
A University of Catania study found that women who did not take the pill had the most sensitive sense of smell around the time of ovulation. But, after just three months of going on the pill, women showed no increased sense of smell at the time they were most fertility
    -IT WEAKENS OUR SENSE OF SMELL
    A University of Catania study found that women who did not take the pill had the most sensitive sense of smell around the time of ovulation. But, after just three months of going on the pill, women showed no increased sense of smell at the time they were most fertility
  • when we think about how smell is tied in with sexual desire, the effects are alarming. Jill Blakeway, a renowned New York-based acupuncturist and author of Sex Again: Recharging Your Libido, says that this could potentially lead us to pick the wrong mate.

  • Indeed, another study by the University of New Mexico showed that when women were on the pill and most fertile, they showed no particular preference of the smell of men with symmetrical features vs. asymmetrical features.

  • -THE PILL LOWERS RISK OF CERTAIN CANCERS
    pooled data from 24 studies to further confirm what the FDA declared in 1988: Those who use the pill are 27% less likely to develop ovarian cancer, and the longer a woman uses the pill, the more protection she is likely to receive from ovarian cancer.

  • Endometrial cancer, which affects the uterine lining. Dr. Bradley Goldberg, a Georgia-based OB/GYN who wrote about benefits of the pill in the Los Angeles Times, cites the following research: Women who use the pill for at least two years cut risk of endometrial cancer by 40%.

  • Additionally, according to Dr. Susan Jick, epidemiology professor at the Boston University School of Public Health and an oral contraceptives researcher, the risk of benign ovarian cysts is also lower in women who use the pill.

  • -IT LOWERS TESTOSTERONE LEVEL
Since the pill increases the amount of SHBG, more free testosterone is absorbed and free testosterone levels — the amount of testosterone that your body can use — is lowered.
    -IT LOWERS TESTOSTERONE LEVEL
    Since the pill increases the amount of SHBG, more free testosterone is absorbed and free testosterone levels — the amount of testosterone that your body can use — is lowered.
  • That in itself can bring on low libido and fewer orgasms, according to Blakeway, as well as thinning hair, infertility, irregular periods, and blood sugar imbalances.

  • -IT CAN MASK REPRODUCTIVE PROBLEMS
Blakeway says that many of the women she treats for infertility only discover reproductive issues, such as imbalanced hormone levels or irregular periods, after having gone off the pill.
    -IT CAN MASK REPRODUCTIVE PROBLEMS
    Blakeway says that many of the women she treats for infertility only discover reproductive issues, such as imbalanced hormone levels or irregular periods, after having gone off the pill.
  • While the problem may not have been caused by the pill, it often remains an unknown for the years a woman is taking oral contraception. Blakeway also points to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as an increasingly common issue for women that is also masked while on the pill.

  • “People often get put on the pill to regulate periods, but what they’re not doing is solving the underlying issues. The cycle the pill creates give women a false sense of security and stops them from getting help for issues such as PCOS,” she says.

  • The bottom line: Different bodies demand different types of birth control. It pays to spend extra time with your OB/GYN to get your hormone levels checked and to talk to your doctor about which options are best for you before deciding on a method.

  • Once on birth control, pay attention to any changes that take place and be your own advocate for change, should you desire it.

  • Hope this helps! Enjoy! Please like and share. Before you save it to your tip kindly respect by liking back or sharing my tips. Thank you. :)

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