Domestic Violence: THE FACTS by Sara Roulston - Musely
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Domestic Violence: THE FACTS

posted in Health & Fitness
08/12/2015
  • Domestic violence and emotional abuse are behaviors used by one person in a relationship to control the other. Partners may be married or not married; heterosexual, gay, or lesbian; living together, separated or dating.

    Examples of abuse include:

    name-calling or putdowns
    keeping a partner from contacting their family or friends
    withholding money
    stopping a partner from getting or keeping a job
    actual or threatened physical harm
    sexual assault
    stalking
    intimidation

  • Violence can be criminal and includes physical assault (hitting, pushing, shoving, etc.), sexual abuse (unwanted or forced sexual activity), and stalking. Although emotional, psychological and financial abuse are not criminal behaviors, they are forms of abuse and can lead to criminal violence.



    The violence takes many forms and can happen all the time or once in a while. An important step to help yourself or someone you know in preventing or stopping violence is recognizing the warning signs listed on the "Violence Wheel."

  • The chart below is a way of looking at the behaviors abusers use to get and keep control in their relationships. Battering is a choice. It is used to gain power and control over another person. Physical abuse is only one part of a system of abusive behaviors.


    Abuse is never a one time event.

    This chart uses the wheel to show the relationship of physical abuse to other forms of abuse. Each part shows a way to control or gain power.

  • ANYONE CAN BE A VICTIM! Victims can be of any age, sex, race, culture, religion, education, employment or marital status. Although both men and women can be abused, most victims are women. Children in homes where there is domestic violence are more likely to be abused and/or neglected. Most children in these homes know about the violence. Even if a child is not physically harmed, they may have emotional and behavior problems.

  • Many people who are being abused do not see themselves as victims. Also, abusers do not see themselves as being abusive. People often think of domestic violence as physical violence, such as hitting. However, domestic violence takes other forms, such as psychological, emotional, or sexual abuse.
    Domestic violence is about one person in a relationship using a pattern of behaviors to control the other person. It can happen to people who are married or not married; heterosexual, gay, or lesbian; living together, separated, or dating.

  • If your partner repeatedly uses one or more of the following to control you;

    pushing, hitting, slapping, choking, kicking, or biting
    threatening you, your children, other family members or pets
    threatening suicide to get you to do something
    using or threatening to use a weapon against you
    keeping or taking your paycheck
    puts you down or makes you feel bad
    forcing you to have sex or to do sexual acts you do not want or like
    keeping you from seeing your friends, family or from going to work
    YOU HAVE BEEN ABUSED!!

  • Alcohol, drug abuse, stress, and mental illness cause domestic violence.

    Alcohol use, drug use, and stress do not cause domestic violence; they may go along with domestic violence, but they do not cause the violence. Abusers often say they use these excuses for their violence. (Michigan Judicial Institute, Domestic Violence Benchbook, 1998, p. 1.6 - 1.7)
    Generally, domestic violence happens when an abuser has learned and chooses to abuse. (Michigan Judicial Institute, Domestic Violence Benchbook, 1998, p. 6-10)

  • Domestic violence is rarely caused by mental illness, but it is often used as an excuse for domestic violence. (Michigan Judicial Institute, Domestic Violence Benchbook, 1998, p. 1 - 8)
    Domestic violence is rarely caused by mental illness, but it is often used as an excuse for domestic violence. (Michigan Judicial Institute, Domestic Violence Benchbook, 1998, p. 1 - 8)
  • http://www.domesticviolence.org

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